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Only One Day Left to Get An Early Bird Discount for the 2017 MARPA EMEA Conference in Dublin!

Don’t forget to register today for the 2017 MARPA EMEA Conference!  The Early Bird discount expires tomorrow, so register before April 1st to save!

The 2017 MARPA EMEA Conference has a lot of opportunities to offer!  Join Keynote speaker Fergus Wilson, Chief Technical Officer for Aer Lingus, and Brian Gialloreto, Manager of Component Engineering at Delta Air Lines to hear how their carriers use PMA to increase savings and reliability.  Learn about the newest developments in international PMA markets like Japan, Latin America, and Europe.  Dive into manufacturer’s success stories and learn ways to energize your company.  Find the financial strategy you need to guide your company through the PMA landscape. The Conference Agenda is packed with speakers you want to see, and with networking opportunities!  Your customers and regulators will be there… will you?

To register, just click here for a registration form or to register online.  If you have any questions, contact MARPA by calling (202) 628-6777.  We look forward to seeing you in Dublin!

FAA Proposes Special Conditions for Non-Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

The FAA has proposed a set of special conditions that would apply to a set of certification projects involving an inflatable restraint system with non-rechargeable lithium batteries.  These special conditions could have far-reaching effect that goes beyond the STC projects for which they are intended.

The special conditions would apply to the aircraft listed on the approved model list in an AmSafe STC. The proposal does not list those aircraft – and as the AmSafe STC is not available to the general public, the list is a ‘secret’ list.  This could make specific application of the special condition tricky to identify.  This is concerning because special conditions become part of the type certificate basis, so konwing hich aircraft are potentially affected would be important.

It is possible that anyone attempting to obtain PMA for articles on those aircraft that are affected by the AmSafe STC (or by the non-rechargeable lithium batteries special conditions) would also be expected to comply with the special conditions.  Therefore anyone with an interest in battery PMAs or seat PMAs/TSOAs ought to examine this proposal to establish whether it could affect their business – now or in the future.

The FAA proposed the following special conditions for Non-Rechargeable Lithium Battery Installations, which would take the place of the current storage battery standards under the regulations:

In lieu of Sec. 25.1353(b)(1) through (4) at Amendment 25-123, each non-rechargeable lithium battery installation must:
1. Be designed to maintain safe cell temperatures and pressures under all foreseeable operating conditions to prevent fire and explosion.
2. Be designed to prevent the occurrence of self-sustaining, uncontrollable increases in temperature or pressure.
3. Not emit explosive or toxic gases, either in normal operation or as a result of its failure, that may accumulate in hazardous quantities within the airplane.
4. Meet the requirements of Sec. 25.863.
5. Not damage surrounding structure or adjacent systems, equipment, or electrical wiring from corrosive fluids or gases that may escape in such a way as to cause a major or more severe failure condition.
6. Have provisions to prevent any hazardous effect on airplane structure or systems caused by the maximum amount of heat it can generate due to any failure of it or its individual cells.
7. Have a failure sensing and warning system to alert the flightcrew if its failure affects safe operation of the airplane.
8. Have a means for the flightcrew or maintenance personnel to determine the battery charge state if the battery’s function is required for safe operation of the airplane.

Note: A battery system consists of the battery and any protective, monitoring, and alerting circuitry or hardware inside or outside of the battery. It also includes vents (where necessary) and packaging. For the purpose of these special conditions, a “battery” and “battery system” are referred to as a battery.

The discussion associated with the proposed special conditions states that the special conditions are “necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards.”  Because of their special application to non-rechargeable lithium battery installations, it is possible that this could serve as the model for a regulation that applies to non-rechargeable lithium batteries.

Tour MRO Dublin Aerospace at the MARPA EMEA Conference!

MARPA is very excited to announce that Dublin Aerospace has agreed to host a tour for attendees of the MARPA EMEA Conference on the morning of May 10, 2017. The MARPA EMEA Conference itself is scheduled for May 8-9 at the Dublin Hilton Kilmainham in Dublin, Ireland. This is the third year that MARPA has put on a European conference, and it will be a great opportunity to meet and network with customers you may not get a chance to see at the MARPA Annual Conference in Orlando, as well as hear the latest information and developments from the PMA world.

Dublin Aerospace is based at Dublin International Airport, and is equipped to perform work on aircraft, APUs, and landing gear.  Dublin Aerospace’s primary focus is on the Airbus A320 family and the A330 aircraft, as well as the Boeing 737NG and Classic aircraft. Their APU repair shop focuses on most Boeing and Airbus APUs, and the landing gear facility performs work on both the A320 family and the Boeing 737 family landing gear. Dublin Aerospace has the capacity to process 70 aircraft, 400 APUs, and 250 landing gear annually.*

Last year in Madrid, about a dozen attendees had the opportunity to tour the Iberia Maintenance facility the morning after the conference. The site visit was viewed as a highlight of the event by those who participated, and it was generally agreed that there was great information and ideas to be taken away from the tour. Many participants suggested MARPA hold a similar event this year, and we are pleased to partner with Dublin Aerospace to bring our conference attendees this opportunity.

Don’t miss out on a great chance to meet with your current and potential new customers, and to take a tour of a leading MRO facility. Register for the 2017 MARPA EMEA Conference in Dublin today, and we look forward to seeing you in there!

For more information about Dublin Aerospace, visit: http://dublinaerospace.com/

For more information about the MARPA EMEA Conference, visit: http://www.pmaparts.org/EMEAconference/about.shtml

Questions? Email MARPA Senior Program Manager Katt Brigham at katt@washingtonaviation.com.

*Credit: Dublin Aerospace at http://dublinaerospace.com/grid-12/.

US Government Seeks to Remedy Unfair Competition Affecting Aerospace Trade

I had a great conversation today with the International Trade Administration (ITA).  They are concerned about non-US companies misusing intellectual property (“IP”) claims to in ways that give them an unfair commercial advantage.  I pointed out some situations where IP rights are claimed, but do not really apply, and this is used as justification for a foreign company failure to comply with regulations, causing commercial disadvantage to US companies who do comply with the regulations.

Our next step is to try to entice them to meet with some members to hear their concerns.  We focused in our initial discussion on IP because tat was the focus of the people who were present, but they felt that some of the issues amounted to technical barriers to trade and suggested that they might want to have a technical barriers to trade specialist hear about these issues, too.

I offered to assemble a few affected parties from US aerospace companies who could tell them “the whole story.”  That is where YOU come in.

   Are any of you interested in attending a meeting (not sure if it will be in-person or telephonic) where you would have an opportunity to discuss the details of IP situations with ITA representatives? 

Remember that ITA’s focus is not going to be on general unfair competition – just unfair competition that affects international trade and puts the US at a disadvantage – so we need to be focused on those issues.

Remember also that this meeting is still in the early planning stages – they have not committed to it yet and if it happens then I want to make sure that we have some strong issues to share with the ITA.

If you feel that your aerospace business is being affected by unfair competition from non-US competitors (especially as a consequence of intellectual property claims), please let us know as we work with ITA to set up the next meeting.

MARPA Attends 2017 Aviation Summit

On March 2, MARPA had the opportunity to attend the U.S. Chamber of Commerce 2017 Aviation Summit in Washington, DC.  The event featured addresses and panels by the presidents and CEOs of aerospace industry leading operators, manufacturers, and service providers. Although the focus was primarily on operational issues affecting air carriers like Open Skies, airport infrastructure, and air traffic control, there were a couple of points raised by speakers that are relevant to MARPA members and the PMA industry.

During the manufacturing panel, HEICO Corporation Co-President and past MARPA Annual Conference keynote speaker Eric Mendelson, discussed the importance of choice and competition without which it becomes difficult for carriers to operate cost effectively. He used the decrease in suppliers relied upon by Boeing for successive new aircraft to illustrate the challenges facing both operators and aftermarket parts manufacturers, as competition becomes more and more restricted. He noted that the original 777 had three engine options, and approximately 17 component suppliers provided 75% of components. For the 787, those numbers fell to two engine options, and about four component suppliers for 75% of components. In the case of the new 777 there will be only one engine option and fewer still component suppliers.

This on-going reduction in suppliers means that operators face fewer and fewer choices both at the initial purchase stage and in terms of maintenance over the life of the product. This also means that those suppliers have a great deal of leverage in locking operators into long-term service agreements, which threaten PMA manufacturers.

In order to fight this phenomenon, it is vitally important that our customers be educated through their organizations as to the value of ensuring PMA is viable replacement part option, to ensure that they aren’t locking themselves into unfavorable maintenance agreements that needlessly restrict their replacement part options and drive up their costs. This will become even more important if fuel prices begin to rise, causing operators to look more aggressively for areas to realize cost savings.

Another interesting point was made later in the day, by Dennis Muilenburg, Chairman, President, and CEO of Boeing. He noted the importance of the Ex-Im Bank to financing export of US-manufactured goods, and stated that there is approximately $30 billion in deals merely awaiting the Ex-Im Bank’s board to reach a quorum. This requires one more confirmed nominee (currently, only 2 of the 5 seats are filled, and a quorum is required to approve deals over $10 million).

Although MARPA’s members aren’t generally making deals that require that level of financing from Ex-Im, having Ex-Im move out of limbo would be valuable for MARPA’s members. We’ve talked previously at conferences about the various ways the Ex-Im Bank can support MARPA’s members in exporting goods to credit-worthy customers abroad who may otherwise lack the cash flow to complete a large purchase. If Boeing’s willingness to throw its weight behind Ex-Im results in securing the stability of the bank for the future, the benefits would ripple out to the rest of the industry.  This is something we will be keeping an eye on.

If you have questions about how Ex-Im can be leveraged help your PMA business, don’t hesitate to let MARPA know.